Categories
Music

Rising Music Sensation, Dark Ruby Reveals Career Scoops

Following the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, the creative industry has been left to evolve into a survival nature and style of operation, whereby Artists have had to depend heavily on generating revenue as well as reach to their audience via online music streaming and purchasing platforms. Thus, ensuring digitalisation emerging as the new order of the day for content distribution and consumption due to the lockdown which has hindered Artists from the avenue to perform their Art live on stage, at shows, in front of cheering fanatics.  Many have had to resort to live performances via their social media pages. Although, everyone can tell it doesn’t come close to the feeling and energy both sides let off at live shows. 

Meanwhile, in the Nigerian music industry, Lagos based singer and song writer, Dark Ruby’s case is as peculiar, as she is confident and gives off an energetic vibe. For a Female indie Artist, she had the ability to express herself, thus portraying an underlying intelligence.

Also, anyone who understands the game knows becoming and sustaining a career as an independent music Artist is no piece of cake. To begin with, self-determination to push one’s career without any major label/corporation’s financial backing with contracts, or a long network of marketing and promotional strategies is a journey for only those who dare. 

 

Speaking to her exclusively for theparakeetshow.com was as interesting as it was eye opening, as she let us into her personal life, how covid-19 affected her career as a musician and what she thinks of Afro beat’s evolution in Nigeria.

According to her, “ Wizkid, Burnaboy and other Afro beat Artists opened an avenue for the Afro beat Sound to the world”. Damilola Fakomi presents the excerpts. 

Dark Ruby

Hi, can we meet you? 

Hi, I am Dark Ruby, a musician and a song writer. I started singing professionally in 2019 with my first single titled,  ‘Girl’ and then dropped my second single, ‘On You’ this year. 

What first got you into music? 

I will say I have always loved writing music from way back Primary school, which was when I started writing music and composing songs. Also, I come from a family of music, and my dad was a musician, my sisters love music, so I basically just got into music.

Which Artists would you love to collaborate with internationally and locally?

 Internationally I’ll love to collaborate with Kali Uchis, Kanye West, Jhene Aiko, Erykah Badu, Teyana Taylor, Rihanna, The Weekend ; whilst Locally, the likes of Burnaboy, Odunsi, Wande Coal, Niniola, Tiwa Savage 

If you could go open a show for any Artist who would it be, and why?

Rihanna, Rihanna because she gives us a good time and shows us that she is having fun on stage. Her energy is amazing.

Dark Ruby

What kind of songs do you sing in the shower if you do sing in there?

Singing in the shower is like a ritual for me, I sing soothing songs like Kali Uchis, Erykah Badu  and The Weekend

What would you have loved to do if not music?

I will be an Arts Teacher, as I love performing Arts. If it’s not music, it’s definitely something related to that, if I’m not dancing, I’m painting or doing something art related, a teacher or an OAP because I love conversing with people

At what events have you performed your music?

Medfest, at Freedom Park and Chums and friends

How would you describe and evaluate the emergence of Afro beat in Nigeria?

For a very long time Afro beat has been underrated. But, then with the arrival of Fela unto the scene, he shed more light on the sound. Wizkid, Burnaboy and other Afro beat Artists opened an avenue for the Sound to the world. And now international acts want to collaborate with us and want to work with the African Sound.

Dark Ruby, Lagos, August, 2020

What is your greatest motivation towards creating music?

I will say ‘feelings’’, it all depends on my mood, and experiences I have had with people generally.

What is the biggest challenge you have faced as an indie Artist?

Promotion, promoting music is a completely different thing. It is one thing to make music, it is another thing to promote the music as you have to push and make people listen to your music.

How has Covid-19 affected your career, negatively and positively?

 Negatively with the fact that I can’t produce my own music as I don’t have a home studio. Trust me, it is very frustrating when beats are available and you can’t get out to produce with the beats. 

Positively, it helped my writings as a song writer, I improved. I spent enough time in my room to compose and wrote a lot of songs while at home; Covid-19 showed me that I am really ready to do this music.

Dark Ruby

What legacy do you tend to leave behind for music?

My legacy is not to follow the crowd, I want people to listen to my music and know that this is something different; this is Dark Ruby from the moment they listen to the beats of my songs. I want to take people on a journey with my music.

How effective has social media been towards boosting your creativity and reach?

Social media has been positively effective as you can now promote your music yourself, and all you need is just to make the music, post it on different platforms and use social media to promote it for certain amount of money, and then friends help by reposting.

How responsible has the society been towards your latest single; “On You”?

The society has surprised me as right now I am seeing a star on my song and it is really overwhelming and I don’t expect my songs to be popular the way they are now as I have my doubts because RnB in Nigeria is somehow. The love and stream has been overwhelming. 

What message would you love to send across to your fans?

To my fans, no matter how absurd your dreams are even if it sounds crazy to you and others just do it, because our dreams are valid and we were brought into this world for a purpose , so no matter how crazy or scary it is, do it. Believe in yourself chase your dreams and don’t stop for anyone no matter what. For days when you feel down pick up from where you left and re-evaluate yourself.

Categories
Music

Artist Spotlight: Reeplay

Seun Osho

Popularly known as Reeplay, Jibril Adeiza Omaki hails from Nasarawa and was born in Ikeja, Lagos in 1991. He is the first child of his parents and an older brother to 2 siblings. Reeplay attended Thomas Adewumi International College, Ilorin in Kwara state for his secondary school education and University of Abuja for tertiary studies in sociology. When asked why music? He replied “Why not music, it is life”. The hip-hop artiste who started to rap in junior secondary class 3, boasts of his undeniable versatility, listing multiple genres; “Hip-hop/grime/pop/afro pop anywhere the spirit leads” when asked about his sound. He attributes his initial musical influences to 50 cent, Lil Wayne initially and more recently, Kendrick Lamar, J. Cole, Skepta to name a few.

Reeplay has earned himself a spot on the roaster of top Abuja based artists gracing some of the biggest stages the capital has ever seen like the ‘Buj concert, Hennessy artistry, Davido’s concert, Choc boys nation tour, the Caribbean Concert and many more

@reeplaysumtin

With a series of singles, three collaborative mix tapes, four music videos and one solo E.P under his belt, Reeplay doesn’t seem to be slowing down anytime soon. According to sources, the rapper is currently working on a collective project called GANG BUSINESS. The collective; ANTIWORLD GANGSTERS, is named after his last collaborative mixtape with Odumodublvck, who’s also a member. The collective is made up of Reeplay’s independent label, IZGAAJU and affiliated label BLVCKSHEEP to which Odumodu belongs. Other members include Ekizzy J, Agunnabueze and ace producer, Cross.

I was opportuned to listen to some of the unreleased music at a makeshift studio, and I must say, I’m anxious for the rollout.

Reeplay says his vision for now is to just keep evolving as an artist, continue making great music and by God’s grace headline his own shows for his ever growing loyal fans with a team he is currently pulling together.

Reeplay’s social media handle is the same across all platforms; @reeplaysumtin. Go follow him, and follow us too @theparakeetshow on all social media platforms.

Categories
Visual Art

The Hyper Realist Steering the Contemporary Art Space

As Hyper-realism becomes more prominent in Nigeria and Africa as a whole, we have witnessed contemporary hyper-realists emerge, thereby creating and displaying innovative and spectacular artworks within the artistic space.

With Visual artists getting more support and deserved accolades, the Nigerian Visual art scene is boastful of talents blossoming from the regions of the country.

One of whom, exclusively for theparakeetshow.com , Hamid Ayodeji, was able to have a conversation with, hyper realist Ken Nwadiogbu,

Ken Nwadiogbu

What is Art to you?

Art to me is a visual representation that starts a conversation, Art is way more than an aesthetic beauty, it has to portray a strong message that people can relate to.

What kind of message
do you intend passing across to anyone who comes across your art? Or what kind
of message do you feel your artwork passes across to an average art lover that
comes across it?

I want people to see my art and re-evaluate their lives and society and the world at large, I am opportune to see and witness so many things going on around the world, the idea that I can create Art-works around this socio-political impact in our society in different locations, the opportunity to be able to perceive how the world is, to re-evaluate people’s ideology, either to make it stronger, or different if wrong. My work starts a conversation that help people understand life, socially and politically.

How early did you discover your passion for Art?

Six years ago, I met a guy in University of Lagos, he was drawing the former VC of UNILAG, It was astonishing, I fell in love with Art immediately, i started learning and perfecting, then I became obsessed, my obsession then grew to total and absolute love for Art.

Can you say the people around you are supportive of your passion?

At first it was hard for friends and family to accept, because Art in Nigeria is not as recognized and appreciated as Law, Engineering and all others, but with time it grew and me showing people how lucrative it was and using my works to start conversations that have changed people’s lives, then family and friends became supportive of my art.

In your opinion what is the current situation of the art business in Nigeria compared to when you were much younger?

When I was much younger I did not know anything about art, it was when I started creating Art I got to understand there are Art galleries, Art collectors etc.

Today in Nigeria you can see that even people that are not even art inclined know about art, from the innovations of ARTX Lagos, to some galleries like RETRO AFRICA who are social media conscious, people that advertise on social media and push their galleries out there to the public, now there is growing presence in the Art world here in Nigeria but we are not there yet.

What inspires the uniqueness in your art?

The uniqueness in my art is inspired by the idea that i want to break out of the norm, society and issues. To also create a bigger narrative for people to understand and be inspired about creating works that represent a breakthrough, like my figurative three dimensional hyper realism, which is creating three dimensional object on a two dimensional surface so the object looks so real and at the same time making the paper look torn that people are almost bursting out of the paper, or are sort of caged behind the silhouette of the paper.

Tell us about the first piece of art you made.

Ken Nwadiogbu

The first piece I drew was of a lady I liked, trying to woo her, trying to get her to like me, her name was Tofunmi, she was a model, I created a masterpiece that expressed how I felt about her and it was beautiful, I took it to her house, she loved it but still did not agree to go out with me so I took it back. And yes I still have it till date.

If you were given the power to bring one art legend back to life who would that
be and why?

Ben Enwonwu, he is one of my biggest inspirations, not because of the kind of art he created but because of the kind of stories he tells through his pieces, he expresses Africanism in a very interesting manner.

What is the longest time you have used on one of your pieces?

The Witnesses, I used about 2 months to create that piece, because it had to do with 30 different eyes, and the 30 different eyes were perfectly picked by me, I had to travel around Nigeria to get pictures of eyes from friends that I needed to portray in the piece.

Do you have any piece of art that is priceless, which you feel you can never sell?

I think all my Pieces of art are priceless, I wish I could never sell any of my works but the beauty of Art is, it has to be seen, understood, perceived, owned and it has to be shown around the world considering that is the beauty of creating art. If it does not tour the world then who am I doing the art for, the conversations that burst out of the tours is what makes art really tangible and interesting and the experiences really amazing.

@kennwadiogbu

Considering how much influence emotions has over creating art, which of the emotions will you say drives you the most to create your Art?

The government, the people, the youths of the world lead me into creating art, also cultures, history, people’s experiences, having friends tell me what they go through, these are things that inspire me, my works are created to tell a story because I have something to say that I feel people all around the world can relate to.

Did you at any point in your life study Visual Art asides the basic fine art in
primary and secondary school?

No, I did not at any point study visual Art.

How do you know when it is time to pick up your pen or brush to start creating?

Every day I wake up, the moment you believe Art is just about the money you will not want to create art, but when you know art has to be created because you need to tell people different things, then every time you wake up you pick up your pencil to create art, because then you are not just doing it because you feel like doing it but to change the world.

Also how do you know when a piece is complete and ready to be shown to the world?

You do not know, you just feel it is complete, there is no actual meter that says “it is complete” you just feel it and you just know it is finished.

Have you always known you were going to become a visual Artist?

No, I never thought I was going to be a visual artist. When I was younger it was engineering for me.

What is your take on the increased appreciation and attention African Visual Artist are now getting?

It is amazing, African Visual artists have the best minds in the world, they are amazing, great and talented and it’s only about time the world notices that, it’s an awesome thing that has happened to African Visual artist and we can only hope for the best.

What colour do you feel you connect with the most and why?

I connect with blue, because blue is calm and soothing.

 

Second Image photographed by: @30.12photography

@theparakeetshow

@hamidayodeji